Welcome to Think Psychology Solutions

Think Psychology Solutions
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FAQs

Q:- Your child has an appointment at Think, what can you expect?

A: – The initial appointment is used to develop an understanding of the concerns and worries that are present for your child and to develop an appropriate treatment plan. Typically for the initial appointment we ask that only the parents attend, particularly if the child is under the age of 10, as this will then allow you to have enough time to discuss your concerns fully. If further assessment and treatment is deemed appropriate we will usually ask the child to be present at the second appointment.
For adolescents, however, it is usual that they attend the initial appointment and that they may prefer to speak alone with the Psychologist. It is important that an adolescent is able to express their concerns and worries in a safe and confidential environment. At the end of the initial appointment, you will be provided with feedback and a recommended course of therapy based on evidence-based practice.

Q:- Saturday morning appointments

A: – Some Psychologist’s at Think undertake Saturday morning appointments. There is limited availability of these appointments, however, if you are interested in making your appointment Saturday morning please mention it during your initial phone call to Think.
Think Psychologists also undertake a limited number of appointments outside of normal business hours – usually 8am, 5pm and 6pm appointments weekdays. If you would like an appointment outside of normal business hours please mention it during your initial phone call and we will do our best to accommodate those needs.

Q:- Does Think have a specialist in relationship or marriage counselling?

A:- Yes. Relationship counselling is an area of special interest for some Psychologists or counsellors. Within Think Sean Dicks has a special interest in working with couples (or families) who are struggling to find a way forward. Sean trained as a Psychologist in South Africa (he’s South African, although we’re not 100% sure as he doesn’t show much interest in Rugby ;)) where the training is specifically focussed on relationships and the best therapeutic approaches for couples (and families). He endeavours to help couples focus on the patterns within their relationship that are causing difficulties and look at alternate ways to change these patterns.

Sean is a Clinical Psychologist and he wrote about his approach to couple counselling for our referrers (GPs, Psychiatrists etc.) in our May 2013 edition of Think News.

Q: – Where is the Think Psychology Solutions practice?

A: – We are at Suite 2, 17 Napier Place in Deakin (between John James Hospital and Alfred Deakin High School, up the hill from the Mint). A map and further details can be found on the Contact Us page on this website.

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Q: – How much does an appointment with a Psychologist or Clinical Psychologist cost?

A: – The cost of a session at Think Psychology Solutions is:

Session

Psychologist

Clinical Psychologist

Initial Appointment

$210

$250

Subsequent Appointment

$180

$220

The fees reflect the highly qualified and experienced practitioners we have at Think while trying to keep the sessions affordable. Lower fees are available for Concession Card Holders (e.g. Pension Card, Disability Support Pension) – please mention you have a Concession Card when making your initial appointment.

Note the Australian Psychological Society recommended standard fee for a session is $238.00.

Q: – Is there a Medicare Rebate available?

A: – If you have been referred to a Psychologist or Clinical Psychologist by a GP under a referral called a ‘Mental Health Care Plan’ (the Better Access to Mental Health Scheme) you are eligible for a rebate from Medicare. For a Clinical Psychologist this is $124.50 or for a Psychologist $84.80.

Note please, without the Mental Health Plan referral an individual is not eligible for a medicare rebate.
More information about insurance and rebates can be found here.

Q: – Can I claim on my Private Health Insurance?

A: – This varies greatly from fund to fund. Please contact your fund directly.

Q: – What is the difference between a Psychologist and a Clinical Psychologist?

A: – Good question! 🙂 In our opinion both try to employ similar evidence based strategies, however, a Clinical Psychologist has undertaken further study and supervised practice than a Psychologist. All practitioners at Think are either Clinical Psychologists or Psychologists undertaking the final part of training/supervision to be a Clinical Psychologist.

Q: – What is the difference between a Psychologist and a Psychiatrist?

A: – Another good question! 🙂 A Psychologist (or Clinical Psychologist) has had a minimum 6 years training in Mental Health disorders, assessment and treatment. After conducting an initial assessment they work with clients utilising evidence-based techniques to help a client to think, act or feel differently or to respond or cope with their thoughts, behaviours or feelings differently. A Psychologist typically utilises what sometimes get called ‘talking therapies’ such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT), or Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR). A Psychologist, while often having a good working knowledge of medications, cannot prescribe medication.
In contrast a Psychiatrist is firstly a registered Medical Practitioner (a Doctor). They have completed the education and training required to become a Medical Practitioner and have then subsequently specialised in Mental Health, usually an additional 2 years training followed by work experience. A Psychiatrist has specialist knowledge of mental health medications such as anti-depressants or anti-psychotics and is able to prescribe medication.

Q: – How long is a session with a Psychologist or Clinical Psychologist?

A: – A consulting / counselling session is usually 50 minutes to an hour. This may vary a little however, for example a first appointment might be a little longer or a session with a child a little shorter.